Actscelerate.com Forum Index Actscelerate.com
Open Any Time -- Day or Night
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
@actscelerate Twitter  @actscelerate Facebook  @actscelerate Google+ 

Interesting Data on Average Age of our Ministers
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
   Actscelerate.com Forum Index -> Feature Presentations This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Message Author
Post Interesting Data on Average Age of our Ministers C. Chris Moody
Age 20-30 3.62% Ministers, .62% pastors

Age 31-40 12.61% Ministers, 8.09% pastors

Age 41-50 19.98% Ministers, 21.85% pastors

Age 51-60 25.84% Ministers, 32.18% pastors

Age 61plus 37.95% Ministers, 37.27% pastors

Less than 9% of our pastors are under 40. Roughly 70% are 51 and over. The 20-30 numbers can be a little skewed because of many youth pastors and children pastors, etc. However, remember only 16% of our ministers are under 40.
Belt Jerker
Posts: 511
5/19/15 10:28 pm


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post I know Sterbens already said it but... Brandon Bohannon
Wow!
_________________
Proverbs 3:5-6; John 13:34-35; Acts 1:8
Acts-celerater
Posts: 526
5/19/15 10:49 pm


View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Reply with quote
Post Pastor Under 30 pastor.keith
I'm a COG pastor who is under 30. I am grateful for the opportunity that has been afforded me through the Church of God. I do believe that more must be done to attract younger.

What is in place to support younger men and women who desire to plant churches?
What is in place to mentor younger pastors?
Are our churches raising up younger leaders?


We must ask ourselves, what do we offer the next generation of pastors?
New Member
Posts: 17
5/19/15 11:16 pm


View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Reply with quote
Post Re: Interesting Data on Average Age of our Ministers Link
C. Chris Moody wrote:
Age 20-30 3.62% Ministers, .62% pastors

Age 31-40 12.61% Ministers, 8.09% pastors

Age 41-50 19.98% Ministers, 21.85% pastors

Age 51-60 25.84% Ministers, 32.18% pastors

Age 61plus 37.95% Ministers, 37.27% pastors

Less than 9% of our pastors are under 40. Roughly 70% are 51 and over. The 20-30 numbers can be a little skewed because of many youth pastors and children pastors, etc. However, remember only 16% of our ministers are under 40.


Is it a problem when more mature men are in the majority of pastoral roles? I see that as a more Biblical way of doing things. Now, if there is an attrition problem where there aren't enough replacements, then that's an issue for discussion.
_________________
Link
Acts-perienced Poster
Posts: 11032
5/19/15 11:38 pm


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post Quiet Wyatt
Is there a way we could find out what were the stats from past decades? If we can discern a pattern of a progressively smaller percentage of younger ministers in our ranks, that would be more meaningful. Also, if we could get some good stats on the percentages in other denominations and/or nondenominational churches, I believe that would shed more light on the subject. I do know that in the early 90s when I first got my credentials in the A/G, a similar alarm was being raised about the seemingly progressive graying of their ministerial ranks. It seems to make sense that significantly less ministers would be under 30 in any case, and that that would probably hold true with most any denomination. Acts-perienced Poster
Posts: 12280
5/20/15 12:02 am


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post Quiet Wyatt
I found this interesting info just now:
Quote:
Q: What’s the average age of congregational leaders?
A: In the past few decades, men and women have been entering the ministry at older ages. Most had another career before going to seminary, and by the time they settled into the role of minister they tended to be middle-aged. In a recent study, the median age of senior or solo Protestant pastors was 51. The median age of senior or solo black pastors was 53. Roman Catholic priests are the oldest; their median age was 56. Associate pastors and those serving in non-church settings tended to be slightly younger. In a 2001 report by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics the median age of full-time, graduate-educated minister was 45.


http://hirr.hartsem.edu/research/fastfacts/fast_facts.html#pastmoney
Acts-perienced Poster
Posts: 12280
5/20/15 12:30 am


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post Quiet Wyatt
An interesting look at Southern Baptist pastoral demographics:

http://saidatsouthern.com/how-old-are-most-southern-baptist-pastors/

(Note especially the comments below the graph).

Here is a very interesting set of data about the A/G:

[url]
http://agchurches.org/Sitefiles/Default/RSS/AG.org%20TOP/AG%20Statistical%20Reports/2015%20(year%202014%20reports)/minageann%20median%202014.pdf
[/url]

Also, it appears that pastors of mega churches (2000+ weekly attenders) have a median age of 49, just a couple of years lower than the median age for all brands of Protestant pastors (51).

http://www.christianpost.com/news/report-reveals-salaries-of-megachurch-pastors-46779/
Acts-perienced Poster
Posts: 12280
5/20/15 12:48 am


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post Quiet Wyatt
Apparently, the average age of pastors in nondenominational churches is 50, according to the Hartford Institute. Acts-perienced Poster
Posts: 12280
5/20/15 1:16 am


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post Eddie Robbins
Quote:
Is it a problem when more mature men are in the majority of pastoral roles?


Yes....should be women!
Acts-pert Poster
Posts: 16029
5/20/15 8:01 am


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post shaunbwilson
It's even worse than it appears at first blush. Take into consideration that Millennials have now surpassed Gen Xers as the largest generation in U.S. labor force. Millennials refers to labor force participants ages 18 to 34 in 2015. Gen X refers to the labor force participants ages 35 to 50 in 2015.

Look at the number Chris posted and then consider that there are more Millennials working than Boomers. But Millennials account for approximately 5.62% of ministers, Xers account for approximately 27.55% of ministers, and Boomers make up nearly 63.79% of all ministers. Either ministry is something that most people aren't called into until after age 50 or we have a real problem here.

It's hard for me to swallow the article that was popular a week or two ago that stated that the drop in religious affiliation among Millennials is due to those who really aren't committed dropping out instead of pretending. Is that the case with pastors, too? Is the number of ministers in this age group as compared to the last two generations also because there's a thinning out of the ministers who aren't really committed? Rolling Eyes

Sorry, but churches are failing this generation, and it will have a long-lasting impact on our world if the Lord tarries. I'm talking about an impact on your grandkids' grandkids.



_________________
This post goes out to my mom. She's proud of me because of the way I dress.
Site Admin
Posts: 3047
5/20/15 11:21 am


View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address
Reply with quote
Post Very Critical J David Smith
I heard these same stats a couple of weeks ago. In my opinion, this is the most critical issue within our movement! We are in a crisis!

Here in North Georgia, it is my understanding that we do not have any pastors that are in their twenties! There are less than a handful that are in their thirties!

The age demographic of our ministers is a reflection of the demographic of most of our churches. I have spoken in over 20 of our churches this year for special services. I am alarmed by what I see. The demographic of our congregation matches the demographic that Chris posted about ministers. If there is not an intentional, strategic, honest response to this crisis, I am convinced that the Church of God will cease to exist within the next 15 years! That is not theatrics! That is a fact!

We have already began to cannibalize ourselves by closing churches that typically includes a handful of faithful parishioners who have become tired and frustrated. Moreover, there are few young ministers with a contagious passion to take these churches. The result is that they simple cease to exist.

I went to my first church in 1996 as a 26 year old. We had 15 people on the first Sunday that I was there. However, I felt like I had the greatest opportunity that I could imagine. We worked hard, prayed hard, preached hard, and loved that community intentionally. I had faith that God would do something great. He did! That church is still a continually growing congregation that is the largest church in the county.

I am deeply stirred by these stats. I am also encouraged by the fact that my 20 year old son has accepted a call into ministry. I am excited that we have 5 other students in our student/college ministry that feel a calling into ministry. Part of the effort from me has to be to help them develop their calling and find a place to release it.

I am troubled by these stats, but I am confident that there are solutions. However, we must first address it and face the reality of it, so that we can effectively change it. I have several thought, but I would like to hear the thoughts of others on how we can change these numbers and raise up a generation.
Friendly Face
Posts: 490
5/21/15 8:16 am


View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Reply with quote
Post not meant to be negative .... wayne
But, I think the local Pastors are going to have to solve this problem. HQ is not in the field they are running the company.
Several older Pastors are holding onto their positions even as their churches die. I know why they do this(no retirement, the thought of not being included) but it still needs to change.
We also have Pastors who are too critical of newer preachers(me included at times). We have to realize they are not going to do it our way at least until they get some experience. They have to learn just like we did/do.
There is also a feeling that the new is too far away from God. We have to allow this younger generation to find God for themselves. Put the borders up for them but allow them to worship Him the way they want to. It's not all sin. Hymns vs southern gospel vs contemporary vs rock gospel...make a joyful noise to the Lord.

Also, we pastors need to build some security for these newer ministers. We have to support them financially, spiritually, mentally and physically. Don't throw them to the wolves and say good luck.

Just my beginning thoughts.
Acts Enthusiast
Posts: 1274
5/21/15 8:42 am


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post Quiet Wyatt
Seems to me the best win/win option would be to strongly encourage and empower younger ministers (ideally with an elder pastor mentoring the younger), to plant new churches. All indications are the younger minister has basically zero interest in pastoring a graying congregation, and the older pastor is just probably not going to let go of the reins and retire just so a younger man can take over. Acts-perienced Poster
Posts: 12280
5/21/15 8:56 am


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post Quiet Wyatt
That said, I really don't think it's bad thing that very few 20-somethings are senior pastors. It seems quite natural that that would be the case actually. Acts-perienced Poster
Posts: 12280
5/21/15 9:03 am


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post J David Smith
Quiet Wyatt wrote:
That said, I really don't think it's bad thing that very few 20-somethings are senior pastors. It seems quite natural that that would be the case actually.


I find it interesting that the median age of men entering the Executive Committee during our greatest years of growth (1960-1980) was 43. This was a reflection of the demographic of our movement. Our congregations and ministers were much younger, which was reflected in a younger leadership. When I began serving as a pastor in North Georgia, over 40% were under the age of 40. Today, we are in the low single digits.

The hearts of the fathers must be turned toward the sons. There must be a renewed sense of vision for the next generation. We have to get beyond focusing our efforts on maintenance. There has to be a passionate burden to raise up spiritual sons and daughters!

I am challenged to proactively reach out to the young men and women that sense a call upon their life, and to speak affirmation and hope into them. I pray that these numbers motivate each of us to do more to value the gifts of this generation and help them to reach their purpose and assignment!
Friendly Face
Posts: 490
5/21/15 10:54 am


View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Reply with quote
Post Quiet Wyatt
Please note, I'm not saying 20-somethings can't be in ministry at all. I'm only saying that it makes sense that comparatively few would be senior pastors yet. Acts-perienced Poster
Posts: 12280
5/21/15 11:16 am


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post Old Time Country Preacher
shaunbwilson wrote:
Sorry, but churches are failing this generation,


How so Shaun? How are churches today failing this generation of youth any more than the churches of the 40's, 50's, 60's, 70's, 80's, 90's, etc., failed their generation of youth?
Acts-pert Poster
Posts: 15480
5/21/15 11:40 am


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Post I don't find 50 alarming... Clint Wills
I find the fact that the largest group is 61+ a little alarming, but even then, alarming may be too strong a word. I wonder how many of those pastors are between 60 and 70...what percentage is over 70? My grandpa retired from pastoring in the COG when he was 85.

I would love to know more of the "why", but that is a very difficult answer to get. I learned last fall that I am the only ordained bishop under 40 in my three-state region....and most are still exhorters. I never have gotten a great answer on why my peers have not moved forward with their licensing other than, "why should I?". Honestly, the only reason I did the OB test was because I had taken the OM test recently and wanted to get them all out of the way while I was in study mode!! hahaha!!
Hon. Dr. in Acts-celeratology
Posts: 5145
5/21/15 4:26 pm


View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Reply with quote
Post shaunbwilson
Old Time Country Preacher wrote:
How so Shaun? How are churches today failing this generation of youth any more than the churches of the 40's, 50's, 60's, 70's, 80's, 90's, etc., failed their generation of youth?


Sadly, churches began failing the existing young adult generation starting in the 60s. Let me explain.

While the Baby Boomers (who fall into the Prophet Generation archetype) were young adults, America had a spiritual awakening. Throughout the history of Anglo-Americans since the 1400s, we can document the recurrence of spiritual awakenings. They happen cyclically and rhythmically. We call them the Protestant Reformation, the Puritan Awakening, the First, Second, and Third Great Awakenings, and finally The Consciousness Revolution that climaxed in 1974. What you'll note about these awakenings is that the Consciousness Revolution was the first time that we had a spiritual awakening that focused on a more New Age spirituality than Christianity.

I'm not sure who was to blame for the lack of Christ in this Prophet Generation. It may have been the overly permissive Dr. Spock-inspired parenting they were reared under or it may have been their own turning away. It doesn't matter, though—as a result of the absence of Christ, this Prophet Generation focused on themselves in their spiritual awakening with a focus on things like free love, drugs, and "finding themselves" at the expense of their spouse, their children, and their religious upbringing.

This Prophet Generation continues to focus on themselves, although they've softened quite a bit.

Any missionary will tell you that when you reach out to a foreign people, your outreach must fit the culture. You don't compromise your beliefs or the truths you present, but you do it within the context of the local culture.

This is true in home missions, also. There is a cultural shift that must take place within the church to include the next generation. It's not a matter of scrapping everything we used to do, but a matter of finding a balance that reaches multiple generations. This is something that the vast majority of churches—run by the generation of self focus (see percentage of pastors aged 51+ above)—have mostly decided to not consider or else have decided the cost of trying is too high.

There is a cultural shift that has taken place in the few churches that are successfully growing in the Millennial demographic. This cultural shift includes things like toning down the "rock show" style of praise and worship, shifting the focus of sermons from emotional to (theo-)logical, and emphasizing the sovereignty and authority of God in their churches over the relational and emotional side of God. Again, it's not the complete dismantling of our Boomer and Xer traditions, but finding those things that Millennial culture identifies with and incorporating the ones that are complimentary to our existing cultural identities.

There is very little focus in churches today on cross-generational ministry. For the most part, Boomer and Xer pastors are keeping their cultures contained to their own generation.
_________________
This post goes out to my mom. She's proud of me because of the way I dress.
Site Admin
Posts: 3047
5/21/15 5:10 pm


View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address
Reply with quote
Post Re: not meant to be negative .... Cojak
wayne wrote:
But, I think the local Pastors are going to have to solve this problem. HQ is not in the field they are running the company.
Several older Pastors are holding onto their positions even as their churches die. I know why they do this(no retirement, the thought of not being included) but it still needs to change.
We also have Pastors who are too critical of newer preachers(me included at times). We have to realize they are not going to do it our way at least until they get some experience. They have to learn just like we did/do.
There is also a feeling that the new is too far away from God. We have to allow this younger generation to find God for themselves. Put the borders up for them but allow them to worship Him the way they want to. It's not all sin. Hymns vs southern gospel vs contemporary vs rock gospel...make a joyful noise to the Lord.

Also, we pastors need to build some security for these newer ministers. We have to support them financially, spiritually, mentally and physically. Don't throw them to the wolves and say good luck.

Just my beginning thoughts.


Some very good thoughts here Wayne, some of your best IMO. Good thoughts
_________________
Some facts but mostly just my opinion!
jacsher@aol.com
http://shipslog-jack.blogspot.com/
01000001 01100011 01110100 01110011
Posts: 22193
5/21/15 9:10 pm


View user's profile Send private message
Reply with quote
Display posts from previous:   
Actscelerate.com Forum Index -> Feature Presentations This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.
All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum




Acts-celerate Terms of Use | Acts-celerate Policy
World News Network | Acts-celerate Chat
Contact the Administrator.


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group :: Spelling by SpellingCow.